April’s Moon Has Many Names

WALK WHEN THE MOON IS FULL

by Sid Baglini

MONDAY, APRIL 26, 2021, 7:45 PM

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

If the weather cooperates, we’ll have a Super Moon walk this month.  That’s because this month, it fits the criteria for the designation of a Supermoon which is 7% bigger and 15% brighter than an ordinary Moon.  This month and next month feature the only two Supermoons this year, although March and June are deemed to be by some astronomers.  

The Full Pink Moon is the most common name given to the April orb which promises an extraordinary sight.  Don’t be disappointed if it just looks like the usual golden Moon rising above the horizon to fade to white as it ascends higher.  The term “Pink” refers to the color of a common native flower found this time of year called Phlox subulata or Creeping Phlox (see photo above).  Other names related to seasonal flora are “The Budding Moon of Plants and Shrubs” and the “Moon of the Red Grass Appearing”. Not to be outdone, we also have the fauna-related names like “Frog Moon” (perhaps we’ll hear some belting out their mating calls), “The Fish Moon” and the Moons “When the Geese Lay Eggs” and “When The Ducks Come Back.”  Finally, we have the images conjured by the “Ice Breaks Up Moon” and the “Moon When the Streams Are Again Navigable.” 

A full Moon by any name delights the eye, and we invite you to share it with us at 7:45 on the 26th.  We’ll try to time it so we can see the rising moon cresting the line of trees at the Paoli Memorial Battlefield.

2 Comments

  1. Where and when is the Pink Moon was to start. I am a new resident and looking forward to this garhering

    1. Katherine,

      I hope you got my detailed reply I sent by email earlier today. We meet tonight at 7:45 at the Baptist Church on the corner of 1st Ave. and Channing Ave. We assemble at the side door which faces the Borough Hall opposite on 1st Ave. and entry to the parking lot is off 1st just beyond the cemetery coming from Warren Ave.

      Sid

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